Saturday, July 12, 2014

Project 562

 

Project 562: Changing The Way We See Native America (Phase2)

by Matika Wilbur

    Project 562 will collect photographic stories from citizens of every Tribe in the U.S., resulting in books, exhibitions and curricula.

About Project 562

Last December, I sold everything in my Seattle apartment, packed a few essentials into my war pony, and hit the open road. Since then, I’ve been embarking on an epic adventure: Project 562.

For the past year I have been fulfilling the project’s goal of photographing citizens of each federally recognized tribe in the United States (there are now 566). Most of the time, I’ve been invited to geographically remote reservations to take portraits and hear stories from a myriad of tribes, while at other times I've photographed members of the 70 percent of Native Americans living in urban settings. My hope, is that when the project is complete, it will serve to educate the nation and shift the collective consciousness toward recognizing our own indigenous communities.

Imagine walking through an exhibit and realizing the complex variety of contemporary Native America. Imagine experiencing a website or book, that offered insight into every Tribal Nation in the United States. What if you could download previously untold histories and stories from Apaches, Swinomish, Hualapai, Northern Cheyenne, Tlingit, Pomo, Lumbee, and other first peoples? What if you had heard those stories in grade school? 

Project 562 is making all this happen.

With Your Support

This is Project 562's second Kickstarter campaign for critical funding for our second year on the road. Your help covering the ongoing expenses for transportation, film, administration, lodging, and meals will keep Project 562 strong and on target.

Rewards

We are delighted to offer wonderful "reward" items for this year's Kickstarter. We've partnered with noted Native American fashion designer and artist Bethany Yellowtail for limited edition couture pieces along with original sweatshirts, spirit tees, sweater dresses, and Project 562 posters.We hope you’ll be as pleased as we are with these unique, attractive acknowledgements of your support.

Project 562 Poster

Official 11x14 Project 562 Poster, featuring Darkfeather, Eckos and Bibiana Ancetta from the Tulalip Tribe.

Official Team Spirit Tee of Project 562

The Spirit Tee's offer original Project 562 photographs and are available in size s-xl. Contributors are be able to choose one of three options:

1. Black & White with Starr  2. Slate & White with Cedar 3. Turqoise & White with Canoe Journey Dancer. 1. Black & White with Starr 2. Slate & White with Cedar 3. Turqoise & White with Canoe Journey Dancer.

Mens Hoodie and Project 562 T-Shirt

562 Ladies Hoodie

In true Matika fashion, we’re offering you a sweatshirt that you can rock with boots (it’s not just a hoodie, it’s a dress). Offered in turquoise and grey. One size only.

B. Yellowtail for Project 562

Bethany Yellowtail, fashion designer, stylist, and motivational speaker from the Crow and Northern Cheyenne Tribe has partnered with us to assist in fundraising efforts for Project 562.  In this very exciting collaboration, Yellowtail has transformed Project 562 photography into one-of-a-kind textile prints. She has created three, limited edition couture pieces that will serve as gifts to the generous contributors of Project562:

Yellowtail Shift Dress

This original photographic silky textile by Matika Wilbur has been transformed by B.Yellowtail into a luxurious, dainty shift dress. Available in peach or cream, size xs-xxl.

All Our Relations Crew Neck

Designed by B.Yellowtail, this “vegan” leather crew neck represents the Tribal Nations that Matika will visit; a walking dedication to all of our relations. Available in xs-xxl.

"Paddle To Quinalt" Dress

B.Yellowtail Kaftan featuring Matika Wilbur Photography from the 2013 Canoe Journey. This elegant, hand beaded dress, showcases Quinalt women dancing on the shores of the Olympic Coast in Washington State, welcoming Canoe’s from several Tribal Nations. Available in xs-xxl.

Original image:

Why Project 562

Project 562 creatively addresses and remedies historical inaccuracies, stereotypical representations, and the absence of Native American images and voices in mass media and the national consciousness.  I believe that there is an open space that is yet to be filled- that space is authentic images and stories from within Native America. My work aims to humanize, the otherwise “vanishing race”, and share the stories that our people would like told. In this respectful way, I have been welcomed into hundreds of tribal communities, and I have found that people welcome Project 562, because they are ready to see things change. Conversations about tribal sovereignty, self-determination, wellness, recovery from historical trauma, and revitalization of culture will accompany the photos in captions, video, and audio recordings. 

The time of sharing, building cultural bridges, abolishing racism and honoring the legacy that this country is built on is among us. Project 562 is that platform.

Matika Discusses Project 562 at TED

Watch Our Road Stories

Project 562 in The Media

  • NBC: Native American Travels Across U.S. Photographing Citizens of Tribal Nations
  • Seattle's Stranger: Shooting and Capturing: Matika Wilbur's Fierce Fight Against A Hundred Years of Native American Photography
  • Fusion: You've Never Seen Native America Like This
  • Indian Country Today: Photographer Matika Wilbur's Three Year, 562 Tribe Adventure

Become A Project 562 Ambassador

The Project 562 Team is currently looking for Ambassadors that can assist with important tasks, including 2014 fundraising efforts; social media outreach; general outreach to tribal communities; educational lecture series outreach; and media outreach. We are also seeking new Interns for 2014.If you are interested in volunteering, or in applying to our intern program, please email: jessica@project562.com.

Matika will be visiting a community near you. In advance she is humbly seeking your guidance, input, and involvement in this very important and timely project. Matika would like to photograph elders, culture bearers, community leaders, artists, storytellers, and youth. If you would like to recommend someone to be photographed in your community, please email: m@matikawilbur.com.

Risks and challenges Learn about accountability on Kickstarter

The last year has shown risks and challenges that I couldn't have anticipated: First, the RV that I secured turned out to be a leaky disaster, so I had to take my two-seater Honda instead (funny thing, RV dealers won't lend to artists without a "real job"). Then, after two months on the road, my bestie/companion/assistant decided that "road life" wasn't for her (I completely get it, sleeping on people's couches isn't glamorous, and I love her for coming at all). Nonetheless, I had to find the courage to forge the road alone.

And even though I consider myself a Road Warrior, the road has worn on my spirit, and the constancy of travel has required an endurance that I didn't know that I was capable of. I have found a new strength; I didn't realize that all of the work I’ve done in the past (photo school, commercial photographer, international journalist, at-risk tribal youth teacher and visual literacy professor) would lead to Project 562, but without the accumulation of those experiences, I wouldn’t have the strength, knowledge, and courage to plunge onward into a multi-year national photography project.

I have to tell you, I didn't anticipate that I would need to do a second fundraising campaign. I believed that if I applied for enough grants, one of them would say yes. Over the last year, I applied for 26 artists grants, even though I did receive 4 of them (thank-you), I was told by the others that, "I am a risky investment". Grantors see Project 562 as an improbable feat, and institutions don't want to give their money to risky artists.

That being said, I want you to know that I am progressing mightily despite institutional disbelief. I have been inspired by the “kindness of strangers” I have encountered. I have been motivated by the hope and light I see in the eyes of students and other youth I speak with. I have been rejuvenated by the kindness of the stranger's that I have encountered. I have been restored by the hope that I see in the eyes of students that I speak with.

I had this incredible experience at the bottom of The Grand Canyon. The elders appointed a teenage boy to help me carry my equipment to photo shoots (since there aren't cars down there, and I'm clumsy on a horse). He was kind of quiet at first, standoffish even. But after the first interview and photoshoot, he was excited for the next one. He started suggesting ideas. I could see him listening as we spoke to his elders. That evening, he revealed that he had walked a despairing path, having struggled with depression and his own sense of Tribal identity. As I was leaving, he shyly pulled me aside, and told me that this project gave him a new sense of hope. He said that he believed in me. He said that I was the first lady that he'd ever met that had went on to "do something". He thanked me for giving him hope. He said that his experience with Project 562 had meant more to him than he could articulate.

I repeatedly have experiences like the one in the Grand Canyon. Those experiences give me the strength to keep going; I genuinely believe that Project 562 will help to shift our collective consciousnesses toward respectfully recognizing the beauty of contemporary Native America.

I know challenges lie ahead (and many, many miles), but I feel blessed with spirit and armed with the skills and tools to tackle them, whatever they may be. Your faith and help are all important. T'igwicid.

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    Project by
    Matika Wilbur

    Tulalip, WA

    See full bio Contact me

    • Pledge $10 or more

      768 backers

      A cool Project 562 sticker will be mailed right to your front door. We love things that stick.

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $10 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $25 or more

      949 backers

      You'll get a set of three original Project 562 postcards and that cool sticker.

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $50 or more

      292 backers

      We will happily send you a signed 11x14 Project 562 Poster, featured under the "Rewards" section to the left.

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $75 or more

      192 backers

      Pledge $75 dollars, and you'll sport our Project 562 Team Spirit Tee! Limited edition, stylish, and feels good on the body. (Under "Rewards" also.)

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $100 or more

      122 backers

      You'll receive our 2015 Project 562 Calendar, a Project 562 sticker and a signed 11x14 Project 562 Poster.

      Estimated delivery: Nov 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $115 or more

      85 backers

      You'll receive our Heather Grey Zippy Hoodie (men's or women's) with the Project 562 logo on the back. (Under "Rewards".)

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $115 or more

      44 backers

      You'll receive our Ladies' Hoodie Dress and our Project 562 sticker. (Under "Rewards".)

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $250 or more

      156 backers

      Your name will be acknowledged in the special thanks section of the book; you'll receive a limited edition 562 exhibition poster and a Project 562 hardcover art book signed by Matika Wilbur. (Please note that this gift will not be delivered until 2015.)

      Estimated delivery: May 2015

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $300 or more

      13 backers

      Pledge $300 or more, and we'll send you B.Yellowtail's "All Our Relations" Crew Neck.You'll also be mentioned in the "Special Thanks" section of the Project 562 book. (Under "Rewards".)

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $300 or more

      25 backers

      Or, if you prefer, you'll receive our Yellowtail Shift Dress, an original photographic silk textile by Matika Wilbur transformed by B.Yellowtail into a fabulous dress. You'll also be mentioned in the "special thanks" section of the Project 562 book. (Scroll left under "Rewards".)

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $500 or more

      21 backers

      Pledge $500 or more, and we'll send you a beautiful B.Yellowtail Kaftan dress featuring Matika Wilbur Photography from the 2013 Canoe Journey. This elegant, hand-beaded dress showcases Quinalt women dancing on the shores of the Olympic Coast in Washington State, welcoming canoes from several tribal nations. You'll also be welcomed to the "Invitation Only" artists' reception at The Tacoma Art Museum May 16, 2014, and you'll receive special sponsor thanks.

      Estimated delivery: May 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $1,000 or more

      18 backers Limited (2 left of 20)

      We are offering original, first edition, Project 562 silver gelatin Photographs. Contributor will select photograph of their choice via Tacoma Art Museum Show opening May 17, 2014. This is a "Kickstarter only" offer (retail price is $2,000). You'll receive special thanks in the Project 562 book.

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

      Add $20 USD to ship outside the US

    • Pledge $2,500 or more

      4 backers Limited (6 left of 10)

      Matika will join you... either to take your portrait, Project 562-style, or to speak in your community, at your party, or University. Or, you can join Matika on the road exploring Indian Country, and be part of photographic history (we'll figure out which day works best for your schedule; additional travel expenses are not included). You'll also receive the rewards of the $1000 level.

      Estimated delivery: Apr 2014

    • Pledge $5,000 or more

      1 backer Limited (4 left of 5)

      Matika will join you... either to take your portrait, Project 562-style, or to speak in your community, at your party, or University. Or, you can join Matika on the road exploring Indian Country, and be part of photographic history (we'll figure out which day works best for your schedule; additional travel expenses are not included). You'll also receive a first edition, Project 562 silver gelatin Photograph. Contributor will select photograph of their choice via Tacoma Art Museum Show opening May 17, 2014. This is a "Kickstarter only" offer (retail price is $2,000). You will also receive two B.Yellowtail designs of your choice- via the $300, or $500 level. And of course, you'll receive special thanks in the Project 562 book.

      Estimated delivery: Jun 2014

      Add $50 USD to ship outside the US

    Funding period

    Jan 20 2014 - Feb 21 2014 (31 days)

    About us

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    Tuesday, July 8, 2014

    8 Myths and Atrocities About Christopher Columbus

     

    Published on Indian Country Today Media Network.com

    (http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

    Home > 8 Myths and Atrocities About Christopher Columbus and Columbus Day

    10/14/13

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    On the second Monday of October each year, Native Americans cringe at the thought of honoring a man who committed atrocities against Indigenous Peoples.

    Columbus Day was conceived by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic Fraternal organization, in the 1930s because they wanted a Catholic hero. After President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the day into law as a federal holiday in 1937, the rest has been history.

    In an attempt to further thwart the celebration of this “holiday,” we at ICTMN have outlined eight misnomers and bloody, greedy, sexually perverse and horrendous atrocities committed by Columbus and his men.

    On the Way—Columbus Stole a Sailor’s Reward

    After obtaining funding for his explorations to reach Asia from the seizure and sale of properties from Spanish Jews and Muslims by order of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Columbus headed out to explore a new world with money and ships.

    Brimming with the excitement of discovering new land, Columbus offered a reward of 10,000 maravedis or about $540 (a sailor’s yearly salary) for the first person to discover such land. Though another sailor saw the land in October 1492, Columbus retracted the reward he had previously offered because he claimed he had seen a dim light in the west.

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    Columbus Never Landed on American Soil—Not in 1492, Not Ever

    We’re not talking about the Leif Ericson Viking explorer story. We mean Columbus didn’t land on the higher 48—ever. Columbus quite literally landed in what is now known as the Bahamas and later Hispaniola, present-day Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

    Upon arrival, Columbus and his expedition of weapon laden Spaniards met the Arawaks, Tainos and Lucayans—all friendly, according to Columbus’ writings. Soon after arriving, Columbus wrecked the Santa Maria and the Arawaks worked for hours to save the crew and cargo.

    Impressed with the friendliness of the native people, Columbus seized control of the land in the name of Spain. He also helped himself to some locals. In his journal he wrote:

    “As soon as I arrived in the Indies, on the first Island which I found, I took some of the natives by force in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts.”

     

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    Columbus Painted a Horrible Picture of Peaceful Natives

    When Columbus first saw the Native Arawaks that came to greet him and his crew he spoke with a peaceful and admiring tone.

    “They ... brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things... They willingly traded everything they owned... They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome

    features.... They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took

    it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane... . They would make fine servants.... With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.”

    After several months in the Caribbean, on January 13, 1493 two Natives were murdered during trading. Columbus, who had otherwise described the Natives as gentle people wrote “(they are) evil and I believe they are from the island of Caribe, and that they eat men.” He also described them as “savage cannibals, with dog-like noses that drink the blood of their victims.”

    The cannibal story is taught as fact in some of today’s schools.

    Columbus’ Men Were Rapists and Murderers

    On Columbus’s first trip to the Caribbean, he later returned to Spain and left behind 39 men who went ahead and helped themselves to Native women. Upon his return the men were all dead.

    With 1,200 more soldiers at his disposal, rape and pillaging became rampant as well as tolerated by Columbus.

    This is supported by a reported close friend of Columbus, Michele de Cuneo who wrote the first disturbing account of a relation between himself and a Native female gift given to him by Columbus.

    “While I was in the boat I captured a very beautiful Carib woman, whom the said Lord Admiral gave to me, and with whom, having taken her into my cabin, she being naked according to their custom, I conceived desire to take pleasure. I wanted to put my desire into execution but she did not want it and treated me with her finger nails in such a manner that I wished I had never begun. But seeing that (to tell you the end of it all), I took a rope and thrashed her well, for which she raised such unheard of screams that you would not have believed your ears. Finally we came to an agreement in such manner that I can tell you that she seemed to have been brought up in a school of harlots.”

    Several accounts of cruelty and murder include Spaniards testing the sharpness of blades on Native people by cutting them in half, beheading them in contests and throwing Natives into vats of boiling soap. There are also accounts of suckling infants being lifted from their mother’s breasts by Spaniards, only to be dashed headfirst into large rocks.

    Bartolome De Las Casas, a former slave owner who became Bishop of Chiapas, described these exploits. “Such inhumanities and barbarisms were committed in my sight as no age can parallel,” he wrote. “My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature that now I tremble as I write.”

    Columbus Enslaved the Native People for Gold

    Because Columbus reported a plethora of Natives for slaves, rivers of gold and fertile pastures to Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand, Columbus was given 17 ships and more than 1,200 men on his next expedition. However, Columbus had to deliver. In the next few years, Columbus was desperate to fulfill those promises—hundreds of Native slaves died on their way back to Spain and gold was not as bountiful as expected.

     

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    Columbus forced the Natives to work in gold mines until exhaustion. Those who opposed were beheaded or had their ears cut off.

    In the provinces of Cicao all persons over 14 had to supply at least a thimble of gold dust every three months and were given copper necklaces as proof of their compliance. Those who did not fulfill their obligation had their hands cut off, which were tied around their necks while they bled to death—some 10,000 died handless.

    In two years’ time, approximately 250,000 Indians on Haiti were dead. Many deaths included mass suicides or intentional poisonings or mothers killing their babies to avoid persecution.

    According to Columbus, in a few years before his death, “Gold is the most precious of all commodities; gold constitutes treasure, and he who possesses it has all he needs in the world, as also the means of rescuing souls from purgatory, and restoring them to the enjoyment of paradise.”

    Columbus Provided Native Sex Slaves to His Men

    In addition to putting the Natives to work as slaves in his gold mines, Columbus also sold sex slaves to his men—some as young as 9. Columbus and his men also raided villages for sex and sport.

    In the year 1500, Columbus wrote: “A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.”

    Columbus’ Men Used Native People as Dog Food

    In the early years of Columbus’ conquests there were butcher shops throughout the Caribbean where Indian bodies were sold as dog food. There was also a practice known as the monterĂ­a infernal, the infernal chase, or manhunt, in which Indians were hunted by war-dogs.

    These dogs—who also wore armor and had been fed human flesh, were a fierce match for the Indians. Live babies were also fed to these war dogs as sport, sometimes in front of horrified parents.

    Columbus Returned to Spain in Shackles—But Was Pardoned

    After a multitude of complaints against Columbus about his mismanagement of the island of Hispaniola, a royal commissioner arrested Columbus in 1500 and brought him back to Spain in chains.

    Though he was stripped of his governor title, he was pardoned by King Ferdinand, who then subsidized a fourth voyage.

    RELATED: Christopher Columbus, The Myths Behind the Man

    Full Name:

    Vincent Schilling

    Source URL: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/10/14/8-myths-and-atrocities-about-christopher- columbus-and-columbus-day-151653

    Friday, May 16, 2014

    Many Languages, One America


    Please include attribution to FreePeopleSearch.org with this graphic.
    Many languages,one america, an infographic from FreePeopleSearch.org